Uncategorized

Sustainable, biodiverse mid-rise development for Fishermans Bend

This post is about research recently featured in The Age that promotes an alternative approach to urban development in Melbourne.  This post also appears on RMIT's Interdisciplinary Conservation Science Research Group's blog. https://youtu.be/G3ywg5psAUI The case for an alternative Current approaches to urban development in Melbourne focus on low-density urban sprawl and high-density high-rise. In middle-ring… Continue reading Sustainable, biodiverse mid-rise development for Fishermans Bend

Advertisements
Uncategorized

Detectability, threatened species and environmental impact assessments

This blog post is about an upcoming paper in Conservation Biology. It is now widely accepted that many species are not perfectly detectable during an ecological survey. This means that, sometimes, a species that is present at a site will not be detected by an observer (or observers) during a survey of that site. The… Continue reading Detectability, threatened species and environmental impact assessments

New research

A new, trait-based model of detectability

Garrard, G. E., McCarthy, M. A., Williams, N. S. G., Bekessy, S. A., Wintle, B. A. (2012), A general model of detectability using species traits. Methods in Ecology and Evolution*. doi: 10.1111/j.2041-210x.2012.00257.x This post is about a new paper now available online in Methods in Ecology and Evolution.  Please email me at georgia.garrard@rmit.edu.au if you’d like… Continue reading A new, trait-based model of detectability

New research

Data, data, everywhere!

Ecologists are reluctant to make use of existing data and information when conducting analyses because of concerns regarding inconsistencies in data collection, analysis and sample sizes.  This means that ecologists often feel that they must collect all the data required for a study or, conversely, that there is insufficient data to conduct the study.  But… Continue reading Data, data, everywhere!